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The History of Daylight Savings!!

In 1784 Benjamin Franklin was said to have invented Day Light Savings Time (DST) . His idea for DST was so that the hours of light could be used more efficiently and save more money out in the long run.

Though Benjamin created this idea in 1876 it is an idea of optimizing the sun light as far back as ancient Rome. In 1942 President Franklin D. Roosevelt instituted the first year around DST. This change took place 40 days after the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

In the United States, DST caused widespread confusion from 1945 to 1966 for trains, buses and the broadcasting industry because states and localities were free to choose when and if they would observe DST. Congress decided to end the confusion and establish the Uniform Time Act of 1966 that stated DST would begin on the last Sunday of April and end on the last Sunday of October. However, states still had the ability to be exempt from DST by passing a local ordinance

The U.S. Congress extended DST to a period of ten months in 1974 and eight months in 1975, in hopes to save energy following the 1973 oil embargo. The trial period showed that DST saved the energy equivalent of 10,000 barrels of oil each day, but DST still proved to be controversial. Many complained that the dark winter mornings endangered the lives of children going to school. After the energy crisis was over in 1976, the U.S. changed their DST schedule again to begin on the last Sunday in April. DST was amended again to begin on the first Sunday in April in 1987. Further changes were made after the introduction of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

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